Posts Tagged ‘Russian Internet’

The largest social network Vkontakte keeps evolving

April 20, 2011

Vkontakte continues to change and introduce new rules and features. I’d say that despite visual similarity to Facebook, running campaigns on Vkontakte requires more patience and a different approach. Before tapping into the most popular social network in Russia, it’s crucial to speak Russian and have a clear understanding of your target audience.

I want to emphasise that people spending time on Vkontakte are different from Russians who’ve chosen to be on Facebook. For example, if you want to create awareness about expensive gadgets, it’s not worth the effort running a campaign on Vkontakte, as this network is predominantly occupied by the younger generation with a weak purchasing power, whilst Early Adopters with money prefer Facebook.

In contrast, if you’re promoting summer English language courses, Vkontakte is the place to be; because the majority of Russian teens  actively participate in this network . Some argue that it’s not worth investing in advertising Vkontakte, as SEM on Yandex and Google are bringing more return on investment. In my opinion, it all depends on objectives. For instance, if you want to create a buzz around your brand and listen to what others have to say it’s definitely worth trying Vkontakte.

Vkontakte is completely overwhelmed with adverts, groups, and spammers. My advice to advertisers would be to ensure a high level of prominence in order to stand in this information-dense environment. The Network’s recent decision to stop banner advertising was a definite shift towards better user experience. However, this month Vkontakte has introduced a new type of advertising: video banners. This exciting innovation means that each time a user clicks on a small textual and visual advert a full screen video appears. These adverts are made to encourage sharing of content between the network users. People can “Like” adverts, add to ‘Favourites’ and see other people who are fond of the same videos.

video ad Vkontakte

The Russian digital agency, AdWatch Isobar, is the first in the market to start using this type of advertising. Their ad campaign for Megafon, a major Russian mobile network operator, which was launched 15th of April, has already proved to be a success. According to the MD of the agency, a сlickthrough rate of the campaign was four to five times higher compared with traditional targeted adverts.

Another significant change is the possibility to create public pages. Vkontakte allows the changing of groups into public pages. This makes it easier for organizations and businesses which previously were only able to use groups to engage with their audience. It’s free to create a public page and any member can do so easily. The only difference to Facebook is that you have to provide a phone number to get the page activated. As of today there are 410 967 public pages falling into the following categories: places, small business, companies, organizations, celebrities and goods

The first public page on Vkontakte was created by Sberbank Rossii (Сбербанк России ), the largest bank in Russia  and is run under the supervision of the famous Russian social media expert, Arthur Welf  It appears that Vkontakte encourages users to switch into public pages as it’s becoming increasingly complicated to recruit members to groups. It’s not possible to send out invitations to anyone in the network except your friends. The most simple, but expensive way to recruit new people to groups is through targeted advertising. The other option is to visit other groups and advertise on their walls or by posting engaging and catchy content.

Another option to attract members is through applications. Such an approach is less expensive than targeted advertising, but can be just as effective.

The most popular app on Vkontakte is a game called Тюряга (Prison) with 6 134 947 installations. The goal of the game is to make tattoos to become a respectful criminal. Russian criminal tattoos have a complex system of symbols and this application educates widely on this topic. I think this is an interesting fact, compared to the relatively innocent leader of Facebook apps CityVille.

Furthermore, it is possible to promote a group or a public page by endorsing celebrity accounts and to attract users from external websites. There are many individuals in the network offering promotion services, although I haven’t used any of them and can’t recommend anyone who can deliver notable results.

It’s exciting to follow developments introduced by this network and learn about its members. Bearing in mind that Vkontakte provides many opportunities for understanding how the product or brand is being perceived in various regions of Russia, not simply exclusive to major cities. Facebook is still the favourite network in the Moscow and St.Petersburg population.

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Social Media Monitoring in the Russian Speaking Internet

March 13, 2011
The social media monitoring tools industry in the Russian speaking countries is still in the early stages of development . Until recently , all monitoring was done manually by using free search tools  such as Yandex.blogs, Google.ru, Twitter, Facebook and Vkontakte search. The data was presented in Excel, sentiment analysis was carried out and the results were presented in the form of graphs and reports. NetMind is one of the first social media monitoring agencies in Moscow, working specifically in this area. Anna Rokina, the Director of Research  explains the particulars of online monitoring in Runet. From this podcast I learnt about the current state of the industry. Further to this, I used the following presentation whereby she compares all the social media monitoring platforms available in the Russian market. I’ve translated the main function of the each tool and its developers.

Social media monitoring tools produced in Russia and Ukraine.

Brandspotter – produced by marketers and web developers. Offers sentiment analysis, has its own metrics system and is applicable for measuring the efficiency of social media campaigns.

IQ Buzz – produced by IT specialists for social media monitoring
Kribrum – produced by SEO experts and programmers for social media monitoring
Monitorix – produced by programmers for online media and social media monitoring
Youscan –  – produced by online marketing experts and web developers for social media monitoring
Wobot – produced by students of Moscow State Technical University of N.E. Bauman (MGTU) for social media monitoring
Sematicforce – produced by product management, social CRM, web crawling and semantic search professionals
Buzzware – produced by monitoring experts, marketers and researchers for social media monitoring. 

I spoke with Alexander Sirach, the Sales and Marketing Director at YouScan and  Anton Popov , the MD of Buzzware to learn more about these products. YouScan is the first automated social media monitoring platform in Russia and Ukraine, it released to the market in January 2010. This platform’s  clients are  leading digital marketing & PR agencies in Russia and international companies. According to Alexander the main competitive advantage of the tool is its unique web crawling technology. This enables more content to be indexed as they are not solely pulling the data from the search engines API’s. Sentiment analysis is done manually by trained analysts,categorizing results and reporting to clients.
Buzzware’s advantage is that it was created by social media monitoring experts with a good understanding of the specifics of this industry. In addition, the platform has the most intuitive interface and a great reporting system.

So, what about the Western Social Media Monitoring platforms?

As far as I know the  Western tools struggle to develop a good quality of monitoring tools applicable to the Russian Internet. The main challenge has always been the Russian morphology and now it’s the competition with local players. I came across only Radian6 which offers monitoring in the Russian cyberspace. Sysomos claims to  provide multilingual services, but I haven’t received confirmation that Russian is included.

I believe, foreign companies should consider working directly with monitoring companies in Russia or Ukraine. I found prices for their service much cheaper compared to the West. For example the monthly fee for a full monitoring service with an account manager at YouScan is approximately 500 GBP per month and Buzzware  550 GBP per month.

Russian Vkontakte adopts “ Invites Only” policy.

February 12, 2011

The biggest Russian social network Vkontakte has became the most visited website in Russia with 23 million visitors daily. To celebrate its success the founder of the network, Pavel Durov has introduced a new registration scheme. From the 11th of February 2011 the only way to become a member of the network is to receive an invitation from an existing user. On Vkontakte’s official blog Pavel Durov says that now it’s time to return to the “invites only” system, which was introduced in the very beginning of the network’s development. Now some users have rights to invite new members, whilst others don’t have such a privilege as yet. It’s not clear from Pavel Durov’s message on which criteria the members’ rights to issue invitations is based.

Vkontakte blog

Also in his post Pavel Durov emphasises the importance of using mobile numbers for user identification. He says that the only way for a user to access their account if they forget their log in details is via a mobile phone number. An SMS with a code will be sent to the number provided upon the initial account registration. In case a member fails to provide the a valid phone number it will be not possible for them to obtain access to their account.

A person can become a member of Vkontakte by submitting a code sent to their mobile phone by whoever invites them. The screenshot below demonstrates the new “No phone – no account policy”. The screenshot is in Russian, because the new regulations have not yet been translated to English.

The founder of the site hasn’t explained the reasons behind these unexpected changes. Considering the fact that Vkontakte has serious problems with spam this move can be the opening salvo with the spammers. However, the new rules will make a registration process much more difficult for some users and in some cases impossible. For example, if a foreigner who doesn’t have any Russian connections would like to become a part of the network? How can they solicit an invitation?

This change may restrict opportunities for international businesses to interact with the Vkontakte audience and create online communities inside the network. After listening to online discussions of Russian speaking bloggers about their reaction to the introduction of the new rules I have identified a few opinions.

  • Vkontakte is seeking ways of making more money by creating a mechanism of selling invitations.
  • Vkontakte is increasing its value by making it a more exclusive and desirable place to be, thus empowering their competitive position against Facebook and Odnoklassniki
  • Vkontakte wants to expand its database of members’ mobile numbers with an aim to sell it to businesses.

Obviously, these opinions belong to people who dislike Vkontakte. There is a very negative perception of the network by a small percentage of the online Russian population who don’t like mainstream projects and prefer more elite networks such as Livejournal, Habrahabr, Лепрозорий and Facebook.

Well, there is definitely space for speculation. Vkontakte is usually referred to as Facebook’s clone due to the very similar interface and features. However, Facebook doesn’t apply such undemocratic ways of restricting spam. Anyone can register to become a member and it’s absolutely not necessary to provide mobile numbers. In order to restrict spammers capcha forms are being used on Facebook which seem to work quite well.

It’s worth remembering that the laws about spam in Russia are far less strict compared to the US, thus making it much harder for Russian Internet enterprises to fight spammers. Hopefully, new changes will make Vkontakte a more pleasant place to be allowing their members to enjoy communication with each other with lesse spam on their walls and in their inboxes

Despite all the criticism, Vkontakte will remain the most popular social network among Russian speakers, due to its main feature: free access to the massive library of video and music files.

SEO in the Russian Internet: Where to start?

January 17, 2011

In this post I’m going to have a closer look at the topic of Search Engine Marketing (SEM) in the Russian speaking Internet. I believe that any foreign company who wants to extend their business to the Russian market will have to make a decision on how to implement SEM campaigns in the RuNet.

There are a few options to consider. The less expensive one is to hire a freelancer. I would recommend searching for Russia-based SEO experts on Freelance.ru website. In my previous post I interviewed Mikhail Shakin , an experienced SEO freelancer and excellent blogger. He writes a very interesting and informative blog about the specifics of SEO in Russian search engines. He speaks English well and I am sure would be happy to answer SEM related questions if contacted through his blog. Generally, it’s very important to conduct thorough research about a freelancer’s work and reputation to avoid disappointment. However, it’s hard to undertake such research, if you don’t speak Russian, as this kind of information is mainly available in local non-English industry-related online resources.

Another way to enhance one’s presence in the Russian cyber market is to hire SEO & Internet Marketing companies based in the UK who have native Russian speakers working for them. I found a few UK firms on Google : WebCertain and New Frontier Digital. Unfortunately, not all companies provide employees’ profiles on websites. I came across only one Russian expert working for New Frontie Digital and don’t have a clear idea of the kind of experience Russians working here are expected to have to deliver SEM campaigns.

Some big companies prefer hiring native Russian speakers and let them take charge of online marketing in CIS region. However, it might be difficult to find the right candidate with relevant experience and legal rights to work in the UK. As an option a company can grow their own digital experts by offering Russian speaking employees to take online SEO courses. This will give them an opportunity to learn how to work with Russian search engines whilst practicing on a company’s website. For example, Russia- based company SEO – Study provides such training for approximately £ 360 per month.

Another option is to hire a SEO company based in Russia. This will give certain benefits: local agencies have all the resources to keep abreast with rapid changes of Russian search engines, more native speakers will be available to work on an account and ,finally, prices for services are lower comparing to the UK. In my experience Russians are very motivated to build relationships with clients from the West. Many agencies go the extra mile to deliver great service and results. I understand it’s quite complicated for a foreign company to find the right agency in Russia. I am sure that many still have an assumption that doing business with partners from the former USSR might turn into nightmare. I heard a few concerns from Western marketers about the quality of work middle-sized Russian agencies deliver. I came across a great post by Andrey Milyan, the first editor-in-chief of Search Marketing Standard where he describes the SEO industry in Russia. The article contains lots of criticism. However, the post is almost three years old and I’m sure things have changed.

Obviously, the language barrier is the main handicap for foreign companies to search for agencies in Russia. Many professional SEO forums such as Optimization.ru and other resources where you can look for experts are not translated to English. Usually, websites of Russian SEO independent agencies are only in Russian as well. I think this is the main reason why Western businesses working in the Russian market keep hiring global media agencies with chain offices in Russia. I agree that this is the most straightforward and relativity safe option, but an expensive one.

Someone from an independent local SEM agency explained to me the way some global agencies work in Russia and why their services might be not as excellent as you expect. Usually, big media agencies offer a broad range of services and started offering SEM not long ago. High-quality SEO services require a lot of time, expertise and human resources. Great SEM department requires investment in human resources and extensive training. To avoid these costs some big agencies tend to hire smaller sub-agencies or freelancers whose services are much cheaper and make profit on a price difference. Thus, a client pays a lot for cheap work and the quality of the work delivered turns out to be poor.

Well-known Russian Internet Marketing Agency Ashmanov & Parners conducted research about the state of the Russian SEO industry in October 2008 which was published in the Internet Marketing Practice magazine. According to their findings the price range for SEO services varies from 60,000 rubles (£1,260) – 120,000 (£2,510) rubles  per month. Despite the fact that this research is three years old it still gives a rough idea about the cost of SEO services in Russia. The authors of the research concluded that different companies provide different levels of customer service and ways of satisfying clients’ needs. My advice would be to spend more time shopping around before making a final choice. If I were to choose a SEM company in Russia, I would consider companies with employees speaking at industry events, that have strong social media presence and have staff members that are fluent in English.


In my next post I’m going to focus on the search habits of Internet users in Russia.

Vkontakte or Facebook? Consider both when promoting your brand on the Russian Internet.

January 4, 2011

I’d like to share an experience I had while working on creating online communities on two powerful social networking sites: Facebook and Vkontakte.I set up a group on Vkontakte for a company, specialising in English language courses and was involved in running a Facebook page for the same brand.

I’m sure there is no need to introduce Facebook; there are no doubts about its global success. According to Social Bakers stats today Facebook has 3 195 140 users in Russia and the number continues to grow. In order to develop a better understanding of the battle for a Russian speaking audience I recommend reading an article in Business Week about Zuckerberg’s ambition to expand to Russia.

For those who aren’t familiar with Vkontakte, it is the most popular social network in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, Belarus and Azerbaijan. According to the Visualize Traffic Vkontakte attracts 7,741,804 visitors per day and 1 in every 215 internet users in Russia logs into this site daily. The average age of the users varies from 12 to 34 years. The site is highly popular with school children and university students who spend their time here rather than watching television. The graph below illustrates that more people prefer to occupy the prime time surfing Vkontakte rather than main TV channels and radio stations which continue to lose audience.

As I mentioned in my previous post, Vkontakte is Facebook’s largest competitor for the Russian speaking Internet audience. Of course there are other Russian speaking social networks, but Vkontakte is the most comparable to Facebook and shares the same ambition; to attract as many members as possible and maximize revenue in the Russian speaking advertising market. Established five years ago, the Vkontakte network has grown into the third most visited website in Russia.

In my opinion, its success primarily relies on a free and high-quality streaming of the pirated video and audio content. Anyone registered on Vkontakte instantly obtains free access to a variety of movies and music, quite often in HD quality.

Recently, Vkontakte has been adapting their offering in order to improve user experience and meet the requirements of prospective advertisers. Gradually Vkontakte is becoming a much more sophisticated and user friendly network. It’s clear that Facebook’s penetration to the Russian market is having an impact on the way Vkontakte operates. For instance, their recent decision to stop banner advertising and the introduction of ‘Vkontakte Pages’ is a definite shift towards better user experience.

It is unquestionable that foreign companies operating in the Russian market should consider Vkontakte as a communication channel for their target audiences. It is also essential to understand whether your target audience spends enough time on Vkontakte to be able to acknowledge your brand and advertising effort. Russian intellectuals and influential online personas consider Vkontakte as a low-class website, full of spammers and time-wasters, however, as a social network you are targeting the masses, and so exposure here is crucial. It’s a great way to introduce your brand to Russian speakers and establish a presence on a localised social network, thus demonstrating your understanding of the Russian culture and people.

I’ve noticed recently that Vkontakte targeted advertising is more cost-effective and better tailored to the Russian market than Facebook. I give an example in a table below. It is my firm belief that for successful promotion on Vkontakte it is fundamental to have a native Russian speaker to do the job. Russian is a complicated language and Google Translate is not enough to grasp important nuances. Even though the site has an English version, not all content is being translated and it seems that the customer service team is not trained to work with foreign clients. My English speaking colleague emailed Vkontakte several times with a request to be introduced to an English speaking account manager, but he failed to receive a response.

Another option is to hire an agency in Russia in order for them to build up an online community and interact with an audience. However, this can be costly and it is more than probable that you won’t be able to fully monitor the communication process.

The table below highlights some of differences between promoting a brand on Vkontakte and Facebook. I’m sure due to a rapid development of both sites these observations will shortly become outdated. My colleague Natalie Copuroglu who specializes predominantly on Facebook campaigns helped me to come up with a few good points.

facebook versus vkontakte



Marketers, expand your knowledge and meet the Russian online users. 

December 13, 2010

At school my favorite subjects were Russian language and literature. I truly enjoyed writing essays, reading, discussing the Russian classics and exploring sophisticated grammar. At the same time, I was also fond of English and assiduously learned the language of business and international communications. It was an unquestionable fact that fluent English would be essential for my career, leisure and overall success in life. Currently, I work for a company providing English language training and it doesn’t take much to put across the message about the importance of English as a second language in someone’s life. I’m very proud that I speak Russian and grateful for all the opportunities I had to master my English which definitely makes my life so much more exciting.

Certainly, English is a global language and this explains why the majority of  native English speakers are not that keen on learning other languages. I’ve met a few self – deluded marketers who believe that Google Translate is enough for desktop marketing research and basic marketing communications. Of course, you can always hire a global marketing agency to implement your campaigns in foreign markets. This is a very common practice and makes perfect sense, but can be costly and less efficient than you expect. I think the  worldwide rise of the Internet provides plenty of opportunities for businesses to meet local partners online and secure brand awareness abroad without spending too much money. However, this requires a genuine desire to learn about other cultures and languages plus it requires time to build relationships with people from another cultural and social background. So, despite the fact that the Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin sang in English a few days ago the majority of Russians still prefer surfing online in their native language and it’s definitely worth making an effort and spend some time trying to understand the differences between .COM and.RU.

In my future posts I’m going to take a closer look at the particulars of online marketing, SEO, social media, public relations and market research in Russia. In order to obtain the most up-to-date and relevant information I have contacted some Russia-based agencies who kindly agreed to help me with content.

Firstly, I’d like to give a brief overview of Runet. I gathered the data from a few open sources: a report called The State of the Russian Internet produced by a group of enthusiasts from infact.ru, the widely – known www.internetworldstats.com and from the Russian Public Opinion Foundation fom.ru

Currently, there are about 59.7 million Russian speaking people using the Internet, this represents 3.0 % of all the Internet users in the world. Out of the estimated 139,390,205 population of the world that speaks Russian, 42.8 % use the Internet. The number of Russian Speaking Internet Users has grown 1,825.8% in the last ten years (2000-2010). According to the Russian Public Opinion Foundation ( Фонд Общественное Мнение) research this summer 28,6 million Russians logged in online at least once a day, with 38,8 million weekly users and 43.7 million monthly.

Bearing in mind that Russia is a vast country with various economic growth rates in different regions, it’s essential to have a clear understanding of Internet penetration at each region. Today, around 51% of the  population of multi-million cities are regular online users. In smaller places  30%-40% people have access to the Internet and only 20% in villages.  It’s worth emphasizing the Internet penetration growth in Russia depends on regions. 33% of .Ru domains are owned by webmasters from Russia’s remote regions ( not from Moscow and St.Petersburg)

The Internet penetration map of Russia.

Russian Internet Penetration Map

This map demonstrates that 30% of online users live in the Central Region (including Moscow), 13% – in the North-West region (including St. Petersburg), 20% – in the Volga region (cities around the Volga river), 13% – in the South and Caucasian regions, 8% – in the Ural region (cities around the Ural mountain chain), 13% – in Siberia and still about 4% – in the Far East region of the Russian Federation.

So what kind of Russians could be referred as regulars in cyberspace? The table below shows that a typical Internet user in Russia is relatively well-off and can afford the following: 37% of Internet savvy population own a car, 23%  have the pleasure of holding a credit card and 47% possess debit cards, 16% use paid medical services, 12% visit cinemas several times a month, 5% use a PDA and 66% of all Internet users  drink beer.

Russian Internet Users

This graph was provided by a very friendly and successful Russian SEO and search marketing agency, Ingate, with offices in Moscow and Tula. In my next post I’m going to look into the Russian search engine market, contextual advertising, popular searches in Yandex and much more.

Search Engine Optimisation (SEO) and Search Engine Marketing on Russian Search Engines.

December 7, 2010

Russian InternetWhile interest in the Russian speaking Internet is steadily growing, more businesses are exploring efficient ways of reaching the Russian speaking audience online. I’m going to take a closer look at the very relevant and controversial topic of SEO and marketing on Runet. I find it exciting because all successful businesses strive to be at the top of search engines results. No doubts, it’s important to secure the best spot in search rankings. Especially, if the company is targeting a foreign market and has to compete with local businesses. Surely, there is a big difference between Search Engine Marketing with Google and Yandex, the largest search engine in Russia and the particularities are not restricted to language itself. I call the topic of search engine marketing in Russia controversial because I heard a few opinions about some unethical tactics companies use while implementing Russian Search Marketing techniques.

I’m trying to find a Russian-based SEO agency to write a post on my blog about the state of SEO, and hopefully this will cover the topic in the near future with more professional insights. In the meantime, I asked my friend Veronika Jermolina who has done some SEO work on the Russian Internet to share her experiences on my blog. Although she may not be an expert, she has a completely independent point of view. This is what she had to say:

“For the past two years I have been working in the usability industry in the UK. In the last 6 months I have taken a keen interest in SEO, mostly through reading and working on optimising a website of a log house construction company for the Russian market. Although I am by no means an expert, I have noticed several differences between the attitudes towards SEO in the UK and Russia.

1. Use of ‘black hat’ methods of SEO

The worst offenders of using these ‘black hat’, or dodgy methods are companies who want to rank highly for competitive queries, such as ‘log houses in Moscow’. For example, link exchange schemes when site A places a link to site B in return for site B placing a link to site A. Another technique that is common in Russia is paid links, when an authoritative website or blogger is paid for placing a link to a website. Don’t get me wrong, I’ve seen serious businesses use this technique in the UK too, but the use of these techniques in Runet is in my opinion absolutely atrocious.

Such techniques, if discovered, are penalised by search engines. They are also counter-productive for the web as a whole. Due to manipulated ratings the user is not given the best result for his/her query. Further, this effort quickly becomes fruitless if the user exits the site immediately due to its poor content.

2. SEO viewed as a part of user-centred and persuasive design

In Russia SEO is definitely seen as one of the most important success factors for a website. In the UK the concepts of usability and user centred design are much more advanced and seen as a priority. Rather than ranking well in search engines the concern is often about being able to deliver relevant, persuasive content and functionality.

3. Lack of research

SEO in itself is a bit of a black box in a sense that no one really knows how search engines work. If people did, it would be too easy to use this knowledge to manipulate and compromise results. However, it is possible to gain a better understanding through changing variables and observing how they affect ranking over time. There are plenty of resources available to English-speaking audiences, for example SEOmoz. One problem I did come across was the lack of research in Russian, specific to Russian audiences. For example, how does transliteration affect the results?”

Russia: The end of YouTube — the official beginning of Internet censorship?

July 29, 2010

The news about Russia’s Far East court’s decision to ban access to YouTube and three online libraries, Lib.rus.ec, Thelib.ru and Zhurnal.ru has been actively discussed online in both languages. According to the court, the reason for banning these sites is that they host extremist ideological materials such as a video called Russia for Russians, promoting nationalism and writings by Adolf Hitler.

I’ve been always curious about the question of Internet censorship in Russia and this story proves that it exists and puts the Internet in danger as the last uncensored medium in Russia.

Freedom of expression is the main condition for democracy. When a local court in Russia bans access to YouTube this means that they don’t respect the essence of the political system of their own country. The beauty of democracy is that everyone has the opportunity to choose their beliefs, lifestyle and to express their point of view. The Internet is a great tool for facilitating such an exchange. Obviously, racism is unacceptable behaviour and it should be taken seriously by the government. However, there is no need to ban an entire international website and those interested in learning about Nazi ideas will circumvent this obstacle.

Nowadays, all democratic counties face the problem of racism; however, I am not aware of any cases where access to YouTube was banned in EU or US. Despite the fact that many countries have been suffering from racial conflicts for a long time, they don’t ban online access to information on this topic, as they take into consideration the fact that everyone has the right to freedom of speech. Actually, this court’s ruling is unconstitutional as it breaches the right to freedom of information, guaranteed by Article 29 of Russia’s Constitution.

 Today a court in Komsomolsk-on-Amur has applied the Soviet style censorship model, tomorrow other local authorities in Russia might follow their lead and start banning online content they find provocative or distributing. More likely, many Russians will support this idea as they are used to the fact that Soviet authorities controlled the information people have access to. I haven’t previously come across major cases of the Internet censorship in Russia and this one seems to be the boldest, banning a massive international site.

 This story is an example of Russia’s vastness and how hard is to ensure that innovative ideas are introduced equally in all parts the country. While Dmitry Medvedev is actively promoting the Internet to the masses and watches Youtube himself, local authorities elsewhere in the province are banning access to such a popular website, including Medvedev’s channel. In the meantime, I can’t imagine that a court in Moscow would ban access to YouTube and leave the population and all businesses based in the capital without such a ubiquitous channel.

Hopefully, the Internet savvy Dmitry Medvedev will ask the court to reconsider their decision and people in Far East of Russia will once again have access to YouTube.

227 most popular websites on the Russian Internet

April 26, 2010

One of my favourite online activities is to discover new websites, analyse quality of content, figure out a website’s audience and check the amount of visitors. To gain this information I use free tools, mainly Alexa.com, installed to my browzer. Another way to keep abreast of the statistics is through data available online by trustworthy companies specialising in research.

In this post I would like to share an online resource, which helped me to learn a lot about Russian Internet or Runet.  Polish company Gemius, specializing in online research conducted a very thorough study into Russian speaking Internet or Runet. I use this resource to learn about Russian popular websites. The research findings are presented as a very simple graph, the methodology applied is described here. The latest data available was collected in December 2009 and all information is still relevant. The total number of websites listed is 227. Unfortunately, there is no brief description of a content of each website and it may take a while to go through the whole list. Besides this, it’s a really great source of information if you want to learn about major players in the Runet. In my next post I’m going to talk about the top ten websites listed. According to the graph, the amount of Runet users is growing.

Одно из моих любимых занятий в интернете – находить новые вебсайты,  анализировать  их содержаниe,  определять,  кто и в каком количестве их посещает. Для того, чтобы получить эту информацию,  я использую бесплатные инстpументы,  в основном  Alexa.com,  установленный на моем браузере.  Еще один способ получения  подобной информации это  ознакомление  c публикациями компаний ,  занимающиxся исследованиями онлайн.

В этом посте я хочу назвать источник, благодаря которому значительно пополнились мои сведения о  российском интернете.

Польская компания Гемиос, специализирующаяся на проведении комплексных интернет-исследований в Европе, провела подробное исследование сайтов Рунета. Я использую этот ресурс, когда мне нужно узнать, какие вебсайты наиболee популярны. Результаты исследования представлены в виде простого графика. Mетодологию можно найти здесь. Последние данные были опубликованы в декабре 2009 года, так что информация все еще актуальна. Всего перечисленo 227 вебсайтов. К сожалению, там нет краткого описания каждого вебсайта, и понадобится достаточно времени, чтобы пройти весь список. В любом случае это хороший источник информации для тех, кто хочет узнать про основных игроков в Рунете. В следующем посте я расскажу о первой десятке. И наконец, этот график показывает, что количество пользователей в Рунете растет с каждым месяцем.


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